How does a fire department connection work?

The Fire Department Connection (FDC), also know as the Siamese Connection, is an important component found on most sprinkler and standpipe systems. When a sprinkler system activates, the fire department connects hose lines from a pumper truck to the fire department connection.

What is a remote fire department connection?

This is a connection on the exterior of a commercial building where a responding fire department can attach a fire hose and pump water into the building’s stand pipe system supplementing the water pressure to the buidling’s sprinkler system.

Is a fire department connection a standpipe?

At the heart of any standpipe or sprinkler system operation is the fire department connection. The fire department connection allows firefighters to supplement the water supply and sometimes supply all of the water to the standpipe system or sprinkler system being used.

Is FDC required?

A fire department connection (FDC) is required for most NFPA 13 and 13R automatic sprinkler systems and standpipe systems. They are not required for automatic sprinkler systems protecting one- and two-family dwellings and townhomes.

How does a remote FDC work?

When a sprinkler system activates, the fire department connects hose lines from a pumper truck to the fire department connection. This connection allows the fire department to supplement the fire protection system in the event of a fire.

What is a standpipe system?

A standpipe system serves to transfer water from a water supply to hose connections at one or more locations within a building for firefighting purposes.

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What type of heat detector must be replaced after activation?

1. Nonrestorable fixed-temperature, spot-type heat detectors are required to be replaced after 15 years from initial installation [see NFPA 72(10), Table 14.4.

What factor has the biggest impact on a ground cover fire?

Humidity, the amount of water vapor in the air, affects the moisture level of a fuel. At low humidity levels, fuels become dry and, therefore, catch fire more easily and burn more quickly than when humidity levels are high.

Tame a raging fire